20 May 2014

Episode 27, Part 2: Scarface (1983)


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A huge thanks to Angelle Tusa for joining us again this episode. You can find her at her main website, The Monthly Midnight Movie Exchange, and A Return to the Dreaming, and follow her on Twitter.

This episode discusses Scarface (1983). IMDb. Wikipedia.

3 comments:

Tony Williams said...

Your discussion on possible future remakes reminded me of a film released in the early 90s called New Jack City that is very much an urbanized take on Scarface. The primary differences are that cocaine was replaced by crack (a major affliction in the inner city at the time) and that the police (Ice-T and Judd Nelson?!?!?!) trying to take down the drug lord (played by Wesley Snipes) are just as prominently featured as the dealers. As I recall, there's even a scene where Snipe's character, Nino Brown, is watching Scarface and mimics his "The world is mine!" motto.

There was a lot of controversy surrounding the film when it was released because critics claimed that it glamourized dealing drugs (despite Nino Brown's fate) and there were several incidents of violence at screenings when it opened.

It's just as 90s as Scarface is 80s, but I recently re-watched it and I thought it held up pretty well. Worth a watch if you ever come across it.

NoelCT said...

Aside from having heard the title from time to time, I had no idea what New Jack City was actually about. Always assumed it was a Johnny Mnemonic style cyberpunk film. XD

I'll definitely have to check it out at some point.

Tony Williams said...


I had no idea what New Jack City was actually about. Always assumed it was a Johnny Mnemonic style cyberpunk film. XD

It took me a few seconds to get that :p.

Writer/director/co-star Mario Van Peebles gets a little heavy handed at times (and needless to say, clich├ęs abound), but it doesn't have the wasted motion of Scarface, features a truly gripping performance by Wesley Snipes, and has a killer 90s R&B/Hip Hop soundtrack. If you want a taste of what it sounded like to listen to urban radio circa 1991, listen to the New Jack City soundtrack. It's a total microcosm of the era.